My Child Is An Immigrant

We’ve spent the last week celebrating the fact that our chid is officially a Canadian Citizen.  We had cake.  We had family photos.  We sung O Canada.  We made a point to visit spectacular Canadian historical sites.  We’ve cherished this moment because it means our child is now part of this great country and because it means we are so close to being done with all the international adoption paperwork.

And yet at the same time, it feels like every single time I read the local news, I’m left in a state of shock as I hear about yet another person of colour who has been called out for being an immigrant (even if they aren’t) and are told to go home presumably based solely on the colour of their skin.  This simply isn’t okay, nor is it the Canada I want to be part of.

I fear for the state of our world.  I’m starting to fear for the state of my own County.

And now I realize I should fear for my child, who is an immigrant.

Yet, my child blends in, so we/he may escape the brunt force of this overt racism and cruelty, especially now while he’s so young and cute. He passes for “white“.  He looks a lot like Mr. MPB, even though there is no genetic connection.  He is being raised by two Caucasian Canadians in a heterosexual relationship.  So, to those who don’t know our story, we usually come off as a normal/ typical family of three. But, will this always be enough to make Little MPB safe from cruel comments?  Or even more frightening, will this always keep him safe from cruel behaviour and actions against him?

And quite frankly, it hurts my heart that I even have to question this.  It hurts my heart that our world seems to be sliding into a state of chaos, where cruelty rains supreme.  It not only hurts, but enrages me that some of our world leaders are actually encouraging such divisive behaviour and/or remaining quiet.  This is not okay.  

I’ve always been an adamant supporter of diversity, immigration and equality.  Yet, I never realized just how immune I was to all of it as a Caucasian Canadian.  I never truly understood that my view of the world was based on my white privilege.  Until now.  Now I am acutely aware of this hatred and how it has the potential to directly impact my family which has ethnically and racially diverse.

All of this said, the MPB’s will continue to celebrate Little MPB’s Canadian Citizenship, because I still believe becoming a Canadian is worthy of a great celebration.

Yet, we will continue to be aware of how scary the world is becoming as we will do everything in our power to keep our son safe.  I will continue to educate people on adoption, racial diversity, immigration, and equality for all.  I will use my voice to support anyone who is treated unfairly based on the colour of their skin, their place of birth, their gender or their sexual orientation.

I will not be silent in the face of fear. I will be a positive voice in a sea of negativity.

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7 Comments on “My Child Is An Immigrant

  1. Evelyn is mixed race (her dad is Latino) and I think about this stuff all the time. She certainly has white privilege because she passes as completely white, being raised by a white Canadian/American (I’m an immigrant too but I’ve never ONCE faced discrimination over that fact – because I’m white). I’m really waking up to the white privilege I’ve had my entire life and what kind of responsibility that carries now as a person who stands up for people of colour/social justice/etc…

    Liked by 2 people

  2. “I fear for the state of our world.”

    Me too

    It’s scary and I have never been so aware of my white privilege and what it has meant to my life and also what it means now in this political climate. Silence is no longer an option. The U.S. is in a perpetual state of chaos and sliding backward away from equality, tolerance, and inclusiveness; rapidly since November 2016. I can’t even believe what is happening lately.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Yup, same here in the states. Although, with what’s happening in Houston and the surrounding areas right now with the flooding, I’m seeing people of all backgrounds coming together and rescuing each other. There is where I see hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I fear for my boys all the time because there is a distinct hatred for brown people.
    I fear my boys will be targeted because they will be mistaken as people from the middle east and label them as “terrorists” (which we certainly are not, and not that I agree to targeting anyone of any color).

    I have faced racism in the States many times (in fact each time I visit that country).

    But when I see my kids, I realize I have the power to change the way the next generation thinks and that gives me hope. I see them playing with children of all ethnics, and that gives me hope.
    We hold the power to change the world, we need to use that power carefully.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It is certainly a scary time. I am hoping that all this bigotry and racism and discrimination is being exposed so that we can see it to fight it. That is my hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My children are half Mexican and they look it. I fear for them, especially now as my oldest is entering school. Kids can be so cruel, and even worse I fear parents of his peers singling him out as an “unfit friend” because he isn’t like them. I fear him being called names and being bullied. But he is an American through and through, just as they are. Things like this weigh so heavy on a mama’s heart.

    Like

  7. I must say, I’ve not experienced any overt racism in Massachusetts being a brown immigrant myself but I do think about what my child’s experience will be when he grows up. My experience with racism growing up in apartheid South Africa will be vastly different to his but thankfully I’ve been given the tools to help him navigate these difficult and unnecessary situations should they arise. I’m ready. And it sounds like you are ready as well :).

    Like

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